Category Archives: Field Notes

What communicators can learn from start-ups: paper folding segmentation

This week I’ve been at #SLUSH15 – an event that brings together 15,000 people interested in start-ups: entrepreneurs, investors, academics and of course the raw talent who power it all.

Here’s one of the things I took away – advice given to start-ups, but just as applicable to communicators operating at the strategic advisor level:

Paper folding segmentation

‘Impossible is nothing’ said Muhammad Ali – and whilst that is true, he did take a rather meticulous approach.

The same goes for start-ups (and communicators) who succeed: they don’t try their luck across all the weight classes.

They pick their fights carefully.

The first step? Segmentation.

Kim Väisänen
Kim Väisänen

Kim Väisänen brilliantly brought this to life with a visual shorthand: and no, I’m not talking about boxing gloves. Rather, something you’ll most likely have to hand: a plain sheet of paper.

From Wikipedia: A size chart illustrating the ISO A series and a comparison with American letter and legal formats
From Wikipedia: A size chart illustrating the ISO A series and a comparison with American letter and legal formats

Now just imagine that piece of paper is the whole world.

Tempting, yet hopefully obvious that you can’t address all of it.

Kim’s advice? Keep folding until you have enough specificity to make it meaningful – but also realise that you can’t fold infinitely.

The average piece of paper can only be folded 7-8 times.

If you want to geek out on more on start-up advice – including Rachleff’s Law of Start-up Success, then there’s a useful write-up here. For those just starting out, this simple ‘business plan basics’ Prezi which I’ve taken on the road in the past may also be useful.

Or, if you simply want to prove that you’re a world class communicator who knows how to target what you do… the time is now to enter the 2015 Gold Quills.

 

2015 Gold Quill - IMAGINE

Share your good practice: let’s #createconnection like never before.

Michael Ambjorn

 

What connects these three leaders?

Earlier this month I changed planes eight times to get to a range of IABC commitments. One of the things that made it so worthwhile was the warm welcome and the human connection one come across wherever a stop is made in the IABC universe.

A quick count tells me I talked 1:1 with a 100+ leaders, but as an espresso drinker I appreciate that your coffee break might not last all day. So I’ll focus in on three leaders who inspired me (in the order I met them).

Marci Larson
Marci Larson

In Jacksonville I had the opportunity to talk at length with long-serving leader Marci Larson.

Patient, graceful – and strategic.

A leader who quietly develops the next generation of local leaders.

We need more people like that.

Cody Bromley
Cody Bromley

In Denver I had the opportunity to meet Cody Bromley, the IABC Southern Region Rising Star for 2015 – and I can see why!

A bundle of energy and insight. Not afraid to challenge – or be challenged.

We need more people like that.

Brenda Siler
Brenda Siler

In Baltimore I had a chance to talk to Brenda Siler – Past Chair of the Association (1998-99). She’s got that quiet confidence and gravitas of an accomplished leader.

Plenty of irons in the fire, yet ready to help if called upon.

We need more people like that.

What they all have in common is the only place that connects internationally minded communicators. Join us.

Let’s #createconnection like never before. 

Michael Ambjorn

An Extreme Reading / Listening List

Sherry Boyd
Sherry Boyd
Julie Ludwig
Julie Ludwig

Our Executive Director Carlos Fulcher and I just hosted a the closing session at the Denver ‘Taking it to the extreme’ conference – organised by the IABC Southern Region and chaired by long-time IABC leader Sherry Boyd and hosted by  Regional Chair Julie Ludwig.  Their team did an ace job bringing together 120+ communicators from across North America.

It was a fast-moving session – the group reflected on the insights, ideas and opportunities that had come up during the conference.

#IABCextreme
Search #IABCextreme for lots of tweets…

One of the outputs from the session was a shared reading / listening list – and it is a long one.

I think we can safely match it to the theme of the conference: taking it to the extreme.

If you have an article, book or podcast to add – please post it in the comments – or tweet me @michaelambjorn and I’ll share in a future post.

Either way, enjoy!

Continue reading An Extreme Reading / Listening List

Making Global Communications Work

Making Global Comms Work Graphic
Click to see full size and read Gay Flashman’s post

Recently I had the privilege of chairing an event on behalf of IABC UK, kindly hosted by top comms headhunting firm VMA.

I’ve been reading the follow-on blog posts and I particularly like the nice visually-amplified summary from Gay Flashman. I would add just one more column (which Gay covers in the main text): the Global Standard. It adds the professional process that helps practitioners make sense of the other two.

Read her full post here.

Meanwhile I commend the panel to you – big thanks to them for sharing their experience and insights from across the globe:

Claudia Damato
Claudia Damato
Tom Blackwell
Tom Blackwell
Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson

Last but not least thanks to Kirsty Brown and Casilda Malagon for organising and inviting. And with that, let’s close out with some practical advice from the UK Chapter President – hear hear!:

Topical to that, do check out the notes from the inaugural IABC Leadership Forum – and look out for the invite to the October edition.

Let’s #createconnection – like never before.

Michael Ambjorn

P.S. You might ask why the Global Standards are not at the centre of the intersect in the Venn: discuss.

3 insights from the #sharingeconomy road from Frankfurt to Florence

I recently ended up with a flight out to Frankfurt – and one back from Florence – without one in between. Before I knew it I had a meeting in Vienna and with that I decided to revisit an earlier form of the sharing economy: the humble hitchhike.

As I travelled, and reliant on the goodwill of fellow Europeans, I thought some of the insights would be useful for the IABC Executive Committee, which is meeting in San Francisco this week. Our focus will be on prioritising the work underway on the #IABC1417 strategy – as well as the #IABCieb business as usual.

And I would like to share here too – often the best insights come from unexpected corners, so I am encouraging you to heckle.

In this week’s Weekly Venn I dig into how the ‘gig’; ‘sharing’ and more ‘traditional’ economies intersect, and in this post I’ll be looking at just one of the circles: the so called #sharingeconomy and what it means (in my view) for IABC.

Why am I focusing in on this one over the others? Because the ethos aligns strongly with our purpose as an organisation.

Context for the trip

When I am not busy doing IABC stuff, giving talks or facilitating purpose-driven groups; one of the things I do is to help organisations with their communications strategy, business models – and getting their governance structure right.

I have for some years been member of a network of physical spaces that go under the name Impact Hub. They’re focused on start-ups with a social change imperative and are located all over the world – including 3 out of 4 of the cities I visited last week. They’re the perfect place to run workshops like this and meet a type of client I particularly enjoy working with.

I also wanted to get a fresh perspective on some of our enduring challenges as an association (technology) and a short term one (the IABC HQ lease runs out at the end of the year and we’re exploring new ways of working as we work towards the move).

What does hitchhiking have to do with comms?

Three #sharingeconomy insights & implications

1. Platforms have expanded beyond all expectation

You might have heard of the phenomenal growth of Airbnb. From niche to mainstream seven short years. Unlike a traditional hotel chain, it owns no rooms, yet claims to bring greater economic benefit to neighbourhoods than traditional operators.

Incidentally, the first website I used to offer up a spare room (or indeed borrow one for the night) is still around now some fourteen years later. Back then I hosted people from Asia, Africa, America, Australia – and of course Europe (and I was in turn hosted across all of those). It was entirely without charge.

Whilst I never had a single negative experience using the completely free approach, it is a lot easier to explain to people the premise of Airbnb. And I have to admit that their website is a lot cooler thanks to the resources they’re able to throw at it.

In similar arena – that of transport – people who would probably never have stuck their thumb out and hoped for the best are trying services like Bla Bla Car to get from A to B as I did last week. It is effectively app-enabled hitchhiking.

Office space, where and how you stay, and the transport you use in-between – have all evolved massively.

Why?

2. Social proof is the key differentiator in the sharing economy

People trust Airbnb, Bla Bla Car and a number of the other leading platforms out there because they all integrate an element of social proof. The fact that you share experiences and see how we’re all connected gives an extra level of assurance. These platforms have invested big in this – and for a few of them it is really paying off.

…which leads to a perhaps counterintuitive insight:

3. Don’t underestimate the power of the analogue

Even in our hyperconnected world we should not forget that the analogue often works just as well. A practical example are these two simple boards from one of the coworking places I spent time at on the trip:

The Impact Hub in Vienna uses a simple board to connect those offering advice and services - to those who need it.
The Impact Hub in Vienna uses a simple board to connect those offering advice and services – to those who need it.
2015 #sharingeconomy profiles board - Impact Hub Vienna
Posting pictures + a little bit of background facilitates serendipitous connections as people build up awareness of each other’s interests – and helps people #createconnection and get to know each other.

They work because of the shared – and sharing – culture.

Three corresponding implications for associations in general – and IABC in particular

A. The sharing economy is not new and the Cluetrain Manifesto from 1999 is still as topical (and provocative to some) as ever. It is time to re-read it and make sure we’re not getting stuck in outmoded ways of operating. I welcome your comments.

Meanwhile, one thing is certain: the demands put on our technology infrastructure at IABC will only increase. We will need to continue to invest aggressively to overcome years of underinvestment.

B. ‘Associating’ is one of the purest forms of social proof – and whilst competition for attention might be stronger than ever and there are more free resources coming online every day, we shouldn’t be timid: we provide an essential glue that helps bind people together thanks to our strong, sharing culture.

At the international level for communicators, we do it better than anyone. Sure, I can easily find thousands of events using meetup.com or, say, lanyrd.com. Anybody can.

But I will always know that if it is an IABC event I will not only have a warm welcome (because IABCers are like that) – it’ll also be useful professionally: network extended; insights shared; skills gained; referrals earned.

C. Whilst we must continue to invest aggressively in the underlying technology that keeps our organisation current and dynamic, we must also remember to temper our desires. It is easy to get distracted or lose focus. Technology is the area that can most easily kill an organisation if it isn’t tied to core purpose, competence and clear direction. IABC went through a near-death experience some 15-or-so years ago due to over-ambition. We have also recently experienced some significant technical discomfort due to underinvestment – at a much more basic level. I reported on this at this year’s AGM.

In conclusion, whilst we continue to uprate our core technology infrastructure, I do wonder what we might learn through the use of a simple paper-and-pen approach at local events as well as our global conferences for part of the drive to connect people.

If you’ve tried it, I’d love to hear from you.

I am also interested in any other ideas you have for IABC to further embrace the sharing economy as a way to build our diverse community, strengthen the global profession – and of course #createconnection like never before. Whether in Frankfurt, Florence or indeed San Francisco or any other number of places where communicators can be found around the world.

Michael Ambjorn

P.S. If, incidentally, you wonder where all the hitchhikers have gone, then the good people at Freakonomics have part of the broader answer beyond Bla Bla Car.