Tag Archive Ginger Homan ABC

ByGinger D. Homan, ABC, SCMP

Regional Conference season is coming

After a blockbuster IABC World Conference in Montréal, our regional conference season is getting closer. I’m excited to be travelling to Melbourne, Australia to attend Fusion 2018 and Richmond, Va. for the Hertitage Conference.

I do hope to see you there — but please help spread the word:

More Regional Conferences coming up

Please help spread the word…

17–19 October 2018 – Connect18 – Nashville, Tennessee

24–25 October 2018 – Africa Region Conference – Johannesburg

25th Annual IABC Africa Conference - learn more: http://www.iabc.co.za/

11–13 November 2018 – Heritage Region Conference – Richmond, Virginia

A call for speakers for 2019

ByGinger D. Homan, ABC, SCMP

Standing up for a #FreePress

Earlier this week IABC joined eight other communication and public relations associations in issuing a statement in support of a free press globally.

It started with an email from the National Chair of PRSA, Anthony D’Angelo, APR, Fellow PRSA, asking IABC to join in support of a #freepress. I’m so glad he initiated this effort — and proud of so many who immediately stepped up.

As a board, we felt it was important to do. Our Code of Ethics states, “I support the ideals of free speech, freedom of assembly, and access to an open marketplace of ideas.”

Every year when we renew our IABC membership, we reaffirm our belief in this code — but everyday when we practice our profession, we live it. While protection of the First Amendment in the U.S. Constitution is specific to the U.S., support for the critical role of a free press is universal.

These are the organizations that joined IABC in making this statement:

The American Advertising Federation
The Arthur W. Page Center for Integrity in Public Communication
The Arthur W. Page Society
The Commission on Public Relations Education
The Global Alliance for Public Relations and Communications Management
The Institute for Public Relations
The Public Relations Council
The Public Relations Society of America
Thank you to everyone who has voiced support and carried the message forward.
ByGinger D. Homan, ABC, SCMP

Dog Days of Summer

In the middle of the United States we are officially in the dog days of summer — long days of sweltering heat and no breeze. We dream of nippy nights and an occasional storm to cool things off.

In the midst of the heat, the board’s Executive Committee met with senior IABC staff in July to hammer out our work plan for this year. This past week it was approved by the board – so it’s full steam ahead.

Since this is the second year of our three-year strategy, so we are definitely focused on advancing the profession, creating connection and developing strategic communicators around the globe. Here are some highlights from each area:

  • Advancing the profession:
    • Certification: We will continue to build recognition of the Global Standard that was established in 2013 and encourage communication professionals around the world to test themselves against it with one of the two certification exams. This summer we started the process to get the CMP level exam ISO certified and the SCMP exam won’t be far behind.It is exciting to watch certification change the perception of our profession. In general, over 50 percent of certified professionals are promoted within the first six months of getting certified – and they are twice as likely to receive a pay raise. To be a part of this movement, see if there is an exam coming up in your area – or apply to host one at your chapter.
    • Corporate memberships: Our new corporate membership package is being snatched up to bring entire communication departments to a common level of expertise. The all access pass to the IABC Academy to train staff – and then test their skills in the certification process is a game changer. In fact, since launching this, we’ve made an all access pass available to individual members as well.
    • Business acumen: We are continuing to explore partnerships that will benefit IABC members and close the gap for the skills we need to be successful in our careers – this includes business acumen. Stay tuned for updates.
    • Ethics in a Box. There is a task force working on a new workshop that we’ve dubbed “ethics in a box.” It will debut at the APAC Fusion conference. The plan is to test this interactive session at regional conferences, refine it and then make it available for chapters to use.
  • Create Connection:
    • Our Mentorship Task Force is exploring mutual mentoring and how we can take advantage of this benefit that some chapters offer. Stay tuned for more as the group makes strides to keep IABC relevant.
    • If you haven’t played in The Hub yet, join the party. This is a great way for members to engage with the IABC community and we will continue to grow our online resources.
  • Develop Strategic Communicators:
    • We continue to develop new courses for the Academy that are focused on preparing you for one of two levels of certification. Expect to see more one-hour, interactive courses coming your way. We are also exploring partnerships to get IABC members the business acumen we need. Stay tuned for updates.
    • Work has already started for our World Conference in Vancouver. If you know you are coming, go ahead and take advantage of the early, early bird pricing – available to the first 150 people or before the end of August, whichever comes first. You won’t want to miss the brain candy that will be waiting for you.
    • One of our single biggest development strategies is leadership. IABC is the perfect place to learn leadership skills that transfer back to your career. Join us in Long Beach, Cali. this February for Leadership Institute as IABC makes its single largest investment in developing leaders.

At our board meeting the IEB approved IABC’s first D&I statement that will serve as a guide to building diversity and inclusion as a core strength. It will be released later this summer with the approved short and long-term strategy to help us achieve more diversity at the international level – including a commitment to the #PanelPledge, a new Chapter Management Award for chapters that excel in D&I and creating safe spaces at all of our events.

I’m proud of how welcoming we are as a group, but there is always room for improvement. In the coming months you will hear more about changes we will be making to ensure we are living this core value. We know that improved business outcomes are directly tied to diverse workforces and communities. IABC is no different. This is critical to our success as an organization and we can’t just talk about, we have to be intentional to succeed.

Where ever you are, I hope you are enjoying your family, friends and work. We have a few regional conferences coming up APAC, Southern, Africa and Heritage. I encourage you to attend if possible. It is always great to connect and grow with other communicators.

 

ByGinger D. Homan, ABC, SCMP

Are you a Martyr?

Learning to lead so others can shine

Many of us had a wake-up call at Leadership Institute last week in San Diego. Our keynote workshop with Cynthia D’Amour, MBA, hit home as she pegged a style of volunteer leadership that leads to:

  • Long hours.
  • Burn out.
  • Zero ability to recruit and engage with board members and other volunteers.

We all know the type and some of us resemble them — they give 110 percent because they care. They work long, hard hours. So, what’s the problem? It is killing our volunteer pool and in some cases our chapters.

Cynthia encouraged us to:

  • Move beyond saying ‘we’ve always done it that way’ by owning results and allowing others to get involved so they too own the results.
  • Develop people rather than doing all the work ourselves. (Who would want to take our place if we are modeling a job that is all work and zero fun?)
  • Invite people to a fun and meaningful experience – rather than expecting them to do everything our way. (Let go and let others take charge. It might not be how we would do it, but they will be engaged and they will want to do it again.)
  • Celebrate the work of others – rather than moan about all the work we’ve had to do ourselves. (Every time we volunteer to do something ourselves, we just stole an opportunity for someone else to shine.)

So, our work and success will be shared with others. We will become masters at giving others the opportunity to shine. The more others shine, the more fun the group will have and before you know it – your community is growing.

This is leadership, as opposed to managing a chapter, region or even the international board. With this style of leadership, there is more focus on getting others involved to be part of the solution. So basically, if we stop being a martyr, it gives others a chance to be engage. The trick? We have to do it before it’s too late.

Cynthia reminded us that people join a community for one of three reasons:

  1. To learn something new.
  2. To help others – a chance to give back.
  3. To meet new people and grow their network.

Cynthia’s best advice for recruiting volunteers or chapter leaders, is that we must first determine which of the three hot buttons motivates each person.

  • If they are new to the profession or want to keep their skills sharp, share about your chapter’s programs and opportunities to participate in putting those on.
  • If they are searching for a way to give back – maybe they want to present a program.
  • If they simply want to grow their network, introduce them to others in the room and invite them back to your next event.

As Cynthia said – “you can’t go too far on the first date. Wait to ask about board service until you have them hooked. Pull them in, instead of pushing them away.”

Even the invitation to our events should contain the answers to all three hot buttons (learn, help and meet) so we are offering something to everyone.

For those of us in the room at LI, it became clear that if we are a martyr leader, we are keeping others from getting involved and having their opportunity to shine. There is an art to leadership – and that art is about knocking down roadblocks and empowering others to succeed.

Sometimes we just have to get out of our own way!

———-

Cynthia D’Amour, MBA, is author of The Lazy Leader’s Guide to Outrageous Results. For twenty years she has worked with association leaders and staff to help get more members involved using a relationship-based approach.

Thank you to these sponsors for our keynote speaker Cynthia D’Amour. A special shout-out to the women leaders of the IABC Tulsa Chapter that made this possible with donations from their companies.

ByGinger D. Homan, ABC, SCMP

Transforming IABC

For the last three years, IABC has been under a transformation – revitalizing programs to improve membership retention and achieve financial sustainability. As we transition from the 2014/2017 strategy to the 2017/2020 strategy, we reviewed IABC’s vision, mission, purpose and philosophy statements to give clarity to who IABC is, what IABC does and the value we bring to communication professionals.

We started the review last fall with a global listening tour, holding appreciative inquiry sessions in every region, and then opened the conversation on this blog for input back in January. Armed with your input, vice chair Sharon Hunter and I presented draft statements at Leadership Institute in Dallas.

Knowing that these statements need to work at the chapter, regional and international levels, the input we got in Dallas from IABC leaders crystalized our path forward. We knew which statements were right, and which ones needed work. We also had a better understanding of what each statement should accomplish and who the intended audience was for each one.

A few times I heard members say, “I need to explain to my CEO the business value of IABC.” Your feedback, gave us our new value proposition: IABC is the only global association connecting me to the people and insights I need to drive business results.

Here are all the statements that will be added to the IABC bylaws and voted on at the Annual General Meeting on Saturday, 10, 2017 in Washington D.C.

  • Vision: Professional communicators at the heart of every organization.
  • Purpose: To advance the profession, create connection and develop strategic communicators.
  • Philosophy: IABC pledges to:
    • Represent the global profession.
    • Foster a diverse community.
    • Focus on insights and results.
    • Honor our Code of Ethics.
      We will achieve this by being open, contemporary and professional.

In addition, this statement will be updated in our Brand Guidebook. It is our elevator speech and will be used in marketing and communications materials.

  • Value Proposition: IABC is the only global association connecting me with the people and insights I need to drive business results.

All of these statements use the work of the Brand Task Force, led by Priya Bates, ABC, MC, CMP, IABC Fellow, as a foundation. That, coupled with your guidance, gives us four strong statements that can serve to unite us and guide our work. They reaffirm our strategic intent as an association to stay relevant into the future, underpinning the 2017-2020 new strategy framework that is currently in development. Stay tuned for more updates as we countdown to kick-off at World Conference in Washington, DC this June.

Thank you to IABC members around the globe who participated in this process and helped get us to a better, stronger place.

A brief sampling of feedback from Twitter:

ByGinger D. Homan, ABC, SCMP

Creating the IABC Vision, Purpose and Philosophy

What an incredible conversation we had at Leadership Institute about updating the IABC vision, purpose, philosophy and value proposition. Any time you look at change, you always expect push back – not spontaneous applause! I think we are all ready to have a statement that is our rally cry and that will keep us on track – at our chapters, regions and at international.

When we got home from Dallas, Sharon Hunter and I recreated the white board on my office wall. We took the time to go through each note and reflect on how it might change the message. It made us aware of a few things that we needed to keep in mind:

  • Remember who the audience is for each statement: Different statements have different target audiences. We need to keep that in mind as we incorporate all the comments and create the next draft.

For example, the vision statement is for us. That statement needs to set out our ultimate goal as an association so that professional communicators know, in a moment, what IABC is trying to accomplish. That is why the statement, “a professional communicator at the heart of every business,” resonated with so many members. It is what IABC is trying to accomplish

However, the value proposition is for our external audience – perhaps a fellow communicator about why they should join, or a business leader on why they should support our involvement. It definitely needs to include the business value and expected outcome. Great input.

  • Combine the mission and purpose statements: There was agreement that having both was redundant and since we are trying to simplify, we will combine these into one statement of purpose.
  • Business communicator vs. professional communicator: should we align with the name of the organization or The Global Standard that we support? Since we are trying to establish the business value of what we bring to the marketplace, it’s probably better to support The Global Standard – so “professional communicator” or “communication professional” will be the language used.
  • Review the statements as a whole. Each statement does not need to contain all the facts. However, as a group, they should reflect who we are as an association – and hopefully, start a new conversation.

We want a vision, purpose, philosophy and value proposition that resonates with our members and becomes our rally cry. The world café showed us that the three areas of our proposed purpose statement – advance the profession, create connections and develop professionals – work for chapters, regions and international. Now we need to work on the words around them.

We got clear feedback that “a force for good” does not resonant with our international audience. We took that to heart and the phrase is now on the cutting room floor (basically, my office floor).

Contributing at the World Cafe for IABC’s vision and purpose statements.

This has been an incredible experience – from getting your input in every region on the Listening Tour, to our hands-on work at Leadership Institute. Your voices are in our heads. We will continue to brainstorm, edit and tweak away. Good governance dictates that an association review these statements every three to five years, in conjunction with a new strategy cycle. So check back for updates posted here. Chapter delegates will vote on any changes at the Annual General  Meeting at World Conference in Washington D.C.

In the meantime, if you have an idea or suggestion, please send it to us, ginger@ziacommunications.com. We are updating these statements as part of our work to develop the next three-year strategy. Below is a chart that shows how all the pieces interconnect.

Recording ideas to take home.

Recording ideas to take home.

Together we can align the vision, purpose and philosophy statements so they guide our actions for the future, help us see the opportunities and ultimately, deliver enduring value to our community.

Together we can align the vision, purpose and philosophy statements so they guide our actions for the future, help us see the opportunities and ultimately, deliver enduring value to our community.

Thanks for all you do.

How Everything Fits

ByMichael Ambjorn

500 Club Members: Support Our Chapters

Guest post by IABC Treasurer, Ginger Homan ABC:

The 500 Club was formed at a time when IABC needed additional cash to fund the association. For a limited time, lifetime memberships were made available for $1,000 to the first 500 members to apply.  This one time payment entitled the 500 Club members to all professional member benefits, but still required members to pay their chapter dues.

At Leadership Institute in February, during a finance presentation, I discovered that some of our chapters are struggling because they have 500 Club members who believe the 500 Club exempts them from chapter dues.

Chapter dues are set at the local level and international never discounts these fees – that has always been up to the chapter. So if you are a 500 Club member, please pay your chapter fees when you get a renewal letter in the mail. If you are one of the members who have ignored these notices in the past, reach out to the IABC office to make a payment, or for this year, write a check to your chapter. They need our funding and support to put on local programs.

I’m proud of my membership in the 500 Club and grateful I was able to step up and help the association at a time when it needed funding. But my local chapter has my heart. These are my friends, my colleagues, my family – and the next generation of communicators.

Let’s make sure we are supporting them with our chapter dues.

@gingerhoman

P.S. You may also be interested in my earlier post on how dues are invested.

ByMichael Ambjorn

How Membership Dues Are Invested

At some point we’ve all wondered how our membership dues are spent. In this post IABC Treasurer, Ginger Homan ABC, sets it all out.

Chapters & Regions

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Ginger Homan

First of all, member dues are compiled from Chapter, Region and International dues. Chapters and Regions determine their fees — some Chapters charge $70, however in many cases it is more like $40. Some Chapters choose to not charge any dues at all. Regions dues range from $25-$90.

These dues are invested by your local and regional leaders in professional development, networking events etc. Speak to your local and regional Treasurer if you want to know more – and consider stepping up – it is a role that can really help you advance.

2016 IABC Who Does What

Who Does What

International

Dues to International is just one of several revenue streams to support work at the international level — 52 percent of the annual revenue; the largest single item. Next in line as sources of revenue are World Conference, Gold Quill and the Job Centre.

Some programs generate revenues, but not a cash return. These include professional development and certification. These two flagships from the 2011-14 strategy are still in the phase where they require significant investment to help them take off. They are expected to start generating a surplus in the coming years, which can then be reinvested.

You can play a part here: step up and serve one of the 22 international committees that advance this work.

Investing in our leaders and our members

Leadership Institute, chapter relations etc. are investments in our leaders. Whilst a net cost, they have a significant return in the form of impact in line with our Theory of Change.

Communication World is a membership benefit and is not designed to generate a surplus.

 

2016 theory of change circles

IABC’s Theory of Change

 

Investing to advance IABC’s strategy – and the profession

Building on the above, our dues support all IABC programs: those designed to generate a surplus for reinvestment – and those that don’t (but are benefits of membership).

2014 Annual Report Income Expenditure Breakdown donuts

Revenue / Expense breakdown at the International level – look for the next update in the annual report released this June.

Below is a list of the areas on the chart and examples of some of the items that category includes.

  • Professional Development
    • Speakers for webinars
    • Software to support the training program
  • World Conference
    • Facilities, food, beverage, Audio/Visual support
    • Keynote speakers
    • Meeting production
  • Certification
    • Development of the certification program
    • Development and management of the exam
    • Costs of administering the exam
  • Gold Quill
    • Evaluation
    • Banquet
    • Awards
    • Software infrastructure
  • Membership / Chapter Relations
    • Scholarships to Leadership Institute and World Conference
    • Chapter Management Awards
    • Bank fees for processing payments
  • Finance / administration
    • Outside professional services including attorney, auditor, finance and human resources
    • Back office computer software and license fees
    • Depreciation
  • Governance
    • Executive Director travel
    • Board travel subsidy
    • Insurance
  • Information Technology
    • Website and any other software not covered above + hardware
    • Consulting for the website and other software applications

You’ll note that the “Finance/administration” portion is 20 percent of the total investment. The norm for professional associations is 25-30 percent.  The International Executive Board is committed to keeping that number as low as possible.

Balanced Budget

The IABC staff worked hard with the Finance Committee to create a balanced budget moving in to 2016. It is directly aligned to the board’s 2014-17 strategy:

“Financial recovery and sustainability is primary, as is the loyalty and development of our members and leaders and consolidating gains from the 2011-14 strategy. Increased reputation in the profession; better brand positioning; and greater interaction with business as a revenue generator are then the big opportunity to be grasped”.

This budget includes investing in:

  • The development of certification exam for the Strategic Advisor level
  • A Learning Management System, allowing the Academy to offer self-paced classes on IABC.com
  • The Global membership survey to determine what members value most
  • An Association Management System, software needed to improve our membership records and an individual’s experience with IABC

If you have questions about IABC finances, please reach out to the IABC Treasurer, Ginger Homan, at ginger [at] ziacommunications.com

You can also find updates in the latest quarterly report. Our annual report that will be issued at the Annual General Meeting at World Conference. We hope to see you there.

Members of Finance Committee

  • Ginger Homan, ABC, IABC Treasurer
  • Michael Ambjorn, IABC Chair
  • Dianne Chase, IABC Vice Chair
  • Victoria Dew
  • Ron Fuchs, APR
  • Alain Legault, MA
  • Carlos Fulcher, MBA, CAE

—-

You can play a part here: step up and serve one of the 22 international committees that advance the work of the association, and the profession. Or consider running for Treasurer of your local chapter or region. It is a role that can really help you advance.

ByMichael Ambjorn

The Missing Advice to Career Advancement – And How IABC Can Help

Ginger Homan

Ginger Homan

Guest post by IABC Treasurer, Ginger Homan ABC:

Much of the career advice we receive is focused on our personal actions – be assertive; promote your personal brand; learn to negotiate; get a mentor; network; speak up; improve your communications skills …

But no matter how close we follow that advice, many can’t break through to top management positions. What is the missing piece?

According to Susan Colantuono, it is business and financial acumen – and the ability to develop strategies based on that knowledge.

As communicators, financials are usually not on our list of fun things to do. As a former chapter president, I know that filling the treasurer role is a challenge – usually requiring arm-twisting and top-notch persuasion skills.

In reality, we should use this position to push outside our comfort zone and learn new skills. Taking on the role of treasurer is not just about paying the bills, it includes:

  • Creating a budget that is aligned with your chapter’s strategic goals
  • Committing to an annual budget planning process
  • Making strategic decisions about what stays in the budget and what needs to be eliminated
  • Determine what tools to use to track the finances
  • Training your board so they understand their role in financial management

Members in your chapter can use this role to increase their business and financial acumen – and to prepare for the next step in their career.

Watch the Ted Talk by Susan Colantuono as she shares the piece of career advice you might not have heard before – then share it with someone you’d like to fill the role of treasurer in your chapter.

Let me know how you get on.

@gingerhoman

ByMichael Ambjorn

February ’16 board meeting

The IABC International Executive Board – aka #IABCieb – recently held its ninth board meeting of this term and here’s a quick recap of what was on the table in addition to the usual reports from the Chair; Vice Chair Dianne Chase (with a specific focus on the work of the Council of Regions); Financials from Treasurer Ginger Homan ABC and last but definitively not least, the report from our Executive Director, Carlos Fulcher MBA CAE:

The 2014—2017 strategy says, in a paragraph:

“Financial recovery and sustainability is primary, as is the loyalty and development of our members and leaders and consolidating gains from the 2011-14 strategy. Increased reputation in the profession; better brand positioning; and greater interaction with business as a revenue generator are then the big opportunity to be grasped”.

Financial Recovery and Sustainability

In addition to the regular report from our Treasurer, Ginger Homan ABC, the board also reviewed:

Customer Service

The board reviewed the latest dashboard, and within that a set of proposed additions related to how the board tracks the quality of our organisational customer service. It is a top priority.

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