Category Archive Strategy

ByZora Artis, GAICD SCMP FAMI CPM

My IABC Story

In 2006, I was a few years into my post-grad study in marketing whilst juggling a management role in a busy integrated marketing communication agency and a young family. I chose an elective unit, Change Communications, where I came across models I still refer to these days and first heard of IABC. It was the source of credible research in the space. Upon reflection, I’d connected with the lecturer, a change practitioner, and respected her opinion and expertise. She planted the IABC seed in the back of my mind.

Jump forward five years and I was at a career crossroad. I’d just walked away from leading strategy in a full service ad agency which was no longer the right fit. I didn’t know what I would do next but I knew I had to build my professional network beyond what I already had. I sought out networking events where I could build my profile and connect with people who might be valuable in my job search.

One of those was an IABC Victoria ‘speed networking’ event facilitated by a recruiter I wanted to reconnect with. At the time, networking made me anxious particularly if I was solo. This event was different. My anxiety quickly dissipated as people engaged with me. I felt welcome. The next IABC Victoria event followed suit. IABC people were friendly, diverse and willing to share their knowledge. It was the right fit and I became a member.

At the same time, I’d started my own strategic consultancy working with agencies and brands alike. My first project for a global pharmaceutical firm involved brand repositioning, employee engagement, internal communication and campaigns. It really was the beginning of the convergence of the disciplines for me. Access to tools, relevant research and knowledge was essential and I found this through my professional associations, including IABC.

During this time, I set myself a long-term career goal to be in paid board director roles by my mid-50’s. I knew I had a learning curve ahead of me, so I pursued board or committee roles with two non-profit charities in areas I was passionate about. One of these was a lead from an IABC connection.

In 2012, the Victorian chapter called for board nominations and I became the Vice-President (President-elect). It was a fertile and safe space to learn and further my director capabilities. It was hard work but incredibly worthwhile. Aside from the professional learning, it enabled me to become a better communicator, leader and connector. This IABC leadership role gave me the opportunity to meet and connect with professionals that I would not have had access to including business leaders in major organisations and subject matter experts in Australia and across the world. Many of these are now friends or colleagues that I can call on for advice without hesitation.

During my time as Chapter President, we worked to build equity in the IABC brand with corporate and individual members through a strong calendar of PD events, content, recognising excellence and bringing the “I” in IABC to life. We reached out to our global connections to deliver content and events. We were fortunate to coordinate member events and corporate visits with IEB Chairs for four consecutive years as well as the brand evangelist and entrepreneur Guy Kawasaki for a sell-out event. That was an opportunity that I took upon approaching him at #IABC15. I’m still a little star struck that I negotiated with him directly and drove him around Melbourne a few months after we met in San Francisco. I look back at my chapter board experience and I’m thankful. I worked with some of the most talented and generous people who gave so much to make it work. We took the time to connect and understand with our current and lapsed members to deliver value that was meaningful to each of them.

One thing that is clear about Aussies is that we do look beyond our shores for validation. Connecting with global SMEs for best practice, as well as engaging Australian communicators in the IABC Gold Quills program are how we can see where we’re positioned. I’m in a privileged position where I have won a Gold Quill for my work, but each year I mentor some who enter the Gold Quills as well as evaluate entries as a Blue Ribbon Panel evaluator (obviously not entries by people I know). I’ve seen some incredible examples of work across many categories and disciplines, and I can’t tell you what a wonderful feeling it is to come across an entry that is at the Gold Quill merit or excellence standard. (I do also judge Australian marketing awards and I can attest to the standard and rigor of the IABC Gold Quill awards.) My fellow Aussies should be proud of the standard of their work as it is certainly on par with the best in the world.

Another interesting insight into IABC comes from volunteering at one or more of the international committees or task forces. Before my IEB commitments, I was able to contribute my brand, governance and program management expertise to time-specific task forces and programmatic committees, which deepened my knowledge of IABC and how it operates globally. This has continued to this day through my IEB commitments, where I’ve either been the IEB liaison or chair. The commonalities across all of these has been gaining knowledge, appreciating the diversity of thinking and culture, the professionalism and the energy of the IABC staff and volunteers.

Stepping up to the IEB in 2016 was a significant commitment which ends this June. It’s a well-run board with strong governance principles and clear focus upon the sustainability of the association and delivering value to members. It’s a competency based board so we have a robust mix of skills and experience, and it’s truly international. Of course, being involved in an international organization means being accustomed to early morning video calls or late evening calls.

Like any professional board, we set the strategic direction, evaluate the progress, change course if needed and oversee risk. It’s been hard work with some challenges, but the reward has been immense. It’s no longer about promise and potential, IABC is really moving forward. It’s thanks to our staff, our volunteers and of course our members.

When you’re in the leadership role, whether it is at chapter, region or international, you do need to walk the talk. Sometimes that means stepping outside your comfort zone. For me it was stepping up to lead, entering the Gold Quills, writing the SCMP certification exam, public speaking or undertaking thought leadership research. I’ve learnt every step of the way and validated my expertise.

Challenge yourself and take a risk. That could be as simple as getting involved at a chapter or regional board, the regional or world conference organizing committee, a programmatic committee or task force, speaking at an event or webinar, running an Academy course or contributing content for CW. Make sure it works for you. IABC is a diverse and inclusive organization that has been called a “tribe” – it is in its own way. It will welcome you, help you, develop you and give back.

What’s next for me? Continuing the growth of IABC in Asia Pacific supporting the chapters to deliver value to their members and our members-at-large.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ByGinger D. Homan, ABC, SCMP

Launching #IABCmentoring

IABC's three Purpose pillars – to which the strategy is aligned to.

IABC’s three Purpose pillars – to which the strategy is aligned to.

In 2018, the International Executive Board (IEB) established a Task Force to explore current programs and better understand mentoring opportunities for IABC chapters. A toolkit and a report with strategic context is now available on the IABC Leader Centre.

2019 #IABCmentoring Bookmark

Mentoring Bookmark: learn how to run your own speed mentoring event. See page 11 of the #IABCmentoring Chapter Toolkit & Strategic Context report.

Thanks to all the chapters who fed into this work as well as all the individual IABC leaders across the globe who helped with input and ideas, including those who participated in the record-setting #CommChat on mentoring. Some of the quotes in the document are from that vibrant exchange.

Contributing Chapters

Mentoring Task Force Members

This work is dedicated to all the IABCers out there already mentoring. Thanks for all you do. We hope it will inspire more leaders across the globe to join your ranks.

Join in: #IABCmentoring

ByGinger D. Homan, ABC, SCMP

Dog Days of Summer

In the middle of the United States we are officially in the dog days of summer — long days of sweltering heat and no breeze. We dream of nippy nights and an occasional storm to cool things off.

In the midst of the heat, the board’s Executive Committee met with senior IABC staff in July to hammer out our work plan for this year. This past week it was approved by the board – so it’s full steam ahead.

Since this is the second year of our three-year strategy, so we are definitely focused on advancing the profession, creating connection and developing strategic communicators around the globe. Here are some highlights from each area:

  • Advancing the profession:
    • Certification: We will continue to build recognition of the Global Standard that was established in 2013 and encourage communication professionals around the world to test themselves against it with one of the two certification exams. This summer we started the process to get the CMP level exam ISO certified and the SCMP exam won’t be far behind.It is exciting to watch certification change the perception of our profession. In general, over 50 percent of certified professionals are promoted within the first six months of getting certified – and they are twice as likely to receive a pay raise. To be a part of this movement, see if there is an exam coming up in your area – or apply to host one at your chapter.
    • Corporate memberships: Our new corporate membership package is being snatched up to bring entire communication departments to a common level of expertise. The all access pass to the IABC Academy to train staff – and then test their skills in the certification process is a game changer. In fact, since launching this, we’ve made an all access pass available to individual members as well.
    • Business acumen: We are continuing to explore partnerships that will benefit IABC members and close the gap for the skills we need to be successful in our careers – this includes business acumen. Stay tuned for updates.
    • Ethics in a Box. There is a task force working on a new workshop that we’ve dubbed “ethics in a box.” It will debut at the APAC Fusion conference. The plan is to test this interactive session at regional conferences, refine it and then make it available for chapters to use.
  • Create Connection:
    • Our Mentorship Task Force is exploring mutual mentoring and how we can take advantage of this benefit that some chapters offer. Stay tuned for more as the group makes strides to keep IABC relevant.
    • If you haven’t played in The Hub yet, join the party. This is a great way for members to engage with the IABC community and we will continue to grow our online resources.
  • Develop Strategic Communicators:
    • We continue to develop new courses for the Academy that are focused on preparing you for one of two levels of certification. Expect to see more one-hour, interactive courses coming your way. We are also exploring partnerships to get IABC members the business acumen we need. Stay tuned for updates.
    • Work has already started for our World Conference in Vancouver. If you know you are coming, go ahead and take advantage of the early, early bird pricing – available to the first 150 people or before the end of August, whichever comes first. You won’t want to miss the brain candy that will be waiting for you.
    • One of our single biggest development strategies is leadership. IABC is the perfect place to learn leadership skills that transfer back to your career. Join us in Long Beach, Cali. this February for Leadership Institute as IABC makes its single largest investment in developing leaders.

At our board meeting the IEB approved IABC’s first D&I statement that will serve as a guide to building diversity and inclusion as a core strength. It will be released later this summer with the approved short and long-term strategy to help us achieve more diversity at the international level – including a commitment to the #PanelPledge, a new Chapter Management Award for chapters that excel in D&I and creating safe spaces at all of our events.

I’m proud of how welcoming we are as a group, but there is always room for improvement. In the coming months you will hear more about changes we will be making to ensure we are living this core value. We know that improved business outcomes are directly tied to diverse workforces and communities. IABC is no different. This is critical to our success as an organization and we can’t just talk about, we have to be intentional to succeed.

Where ever you are, I hope you are enjoying your family, friends and work. We have a few regional conferences coming up APAC, Southern, Africa and Heritage. I encourage you to attend if possible. It is always great to connect and grow with other communicators.

 

ByGinger D. Homan, ABC, SCMP

Are you a Martyr?

Learning to lead so others can shine

Many of us had a wake-up call at Leadership Institute last week in San Diego. Our keynote workshop with Cynthia D’Amour, MBA, hit home as she pegged a style of volunteer leadership that leads to:

  • Long hours.
  • Burn out.
  • Zero ability to recruit and engage with board members and other volunteers.

We all know the type and some of us resemble them — they give 110 percent because they care. They work long, hard hours. So, what’s the problem? It is killing our volunteer pool and in some cases our chapters.

Cynthia encouraged us to:

  • Move beyond saying ‘we’ve always done it that way’ by owning results and allowing others to get involved so they too own the results.
  • Develop people rather than doing all the work ourselves. (Who would want to take our place if we are modeling a job that is all work and zero fun?)
  • Invite people to a fun and meaningful experience – rather than expecting them to do everything our way. (Let go and let others take charge. It might not be how we would do it, but they will be engaged and they will want to do it again.)
  • Celebrate the work of others – rather than moan about all the work we’ve had to do ourselves. (Every time we volunteer to do something ourselves, we just stole an opportunity for someone else to shine.)

So, our work and success will be shared with others. We will become masters at giving others the opportunity to shine. The more others shine, the more fun the group will have and before you know it – your community is growing.

This is leadership, as opposed to managing a chapter, region or even the international board. With this style of leadership, there is more focus on getting others involved to be part of the solution. So basically, if we stop being a martyr, it gives others a chance to be engage. The trick? We have to do it before it’s too late.

Cynthia reminded us that people join a community for one of three reasons:

  1. To learn something new.
  2. To help others – a chance to give back.
  3. To meet new people and grow their network.

Cynthia’s best advice for recruiting volunteers or chapter leaders, is that we must first determine which of the three hot buttons motivates each person.

  • If they are new to the profession or want to keep their skills sharp, share about your chapter’s programs and opportunities to participate in putting those on.
  • If they are searching for a way to give back – maybe they want to present a program.
  • If they simply want to grow their network, introduce them to others in the room and invite them back to your next event.

As Cynthia said – “you can’t go too far on the first date. Wait to ask about board service until you have them hooked. Pull them in, instead of pushing them away.”

Even the invitation to our events should contain the answers to all three hot buttons (learn, help and meet) so we are offering something to everyone.

For those of us in the room at LI, it became clear that if we are a martyr leader, we are keeping others from getting involved and having their opportunity to shine. There is an art to leadership – and that art is about knocking down roadblocks and empowering others to succeed.

Sometimes we just have to get out of our own way!

———-

Cynthia D’Amour, MBA, is author of The Lazy Leader’s Guide to Outrageous Results. For twenty years she has worked with association leaders and staff to help get more members involved using a relationship-based approach.

Thank you to these sponsors for our keynote speaker Cynthia D’Amour. A special shout-out to the women leaders of the IABC Tulsa Chapter that made this possible with donations from their companies.

BySharon Hunter

Countdown to #IABC1720

Recap on the road to a new 3-year strategy

#longread – it has been a journey!

With the annual gathering of the IABC tribe (aka World Conference) kicking off this weekend, excitement is building to launch a new cycle for the future.

We launched a global listening tour in September using Appreciative Inquiry – to engage our community in creating a shared understanding of what we value most to bring forward into 2020 and beyond.

We shared some great stories, experiences and achievements to bring out the best in us.

“You come for the professional development, you stay for the people”, “IABC peers are like family” and “IABC has honed my leadership skills more than any paid gig” are but three examples of what we value as a united peer community. See #IABC1720 for highlights of this journey.

The strength of passion and purpose to advance the profession within our global network cannot be overstated – and it will take a commitment to collaborative leadership to bring this new strategy cycle to life. Fortunately, IABC leaders have this in spades!

Throughout the strategy development work, the International Executive Board, regional and chapter leaders participated where we:

  • Held World Café sessions in all 8 IABC regions.
  • Leveraged Leadership Institute in February for feedback on our statements of strategic intent, field tested the draft #IABC1720 framework and invited leaders to explore “Freedom in a Framework” to align their strategic plans to collaboratively deliver local value.
  • Conducted interviews with global executives to gauge industry pulse.
  • Drew insights from a range of industry trend reports.
  • Liaised across committees to socialize the strategic priorities and gain input.

We are a diverse global community – it is our greatest strength but also our greatest challenge. How can we deliver relevant value across a broad spectrum of needs?

For associations, this doesn’t change at the core: It’s to continue to help members be successful in what matters most to them – supporting through education and insights, credentialing, community exchange and advocacy for the profession. What changes over time is the format and content of programming – and how we create opportunities for people to access it and engage each other to learn and grow.

For communicators in a rapidly changing business landscape, it means a commitment to adapt and develop new multi-disciplinary skills and demonstrate impact on key business outcomes.

Recall the Top Three Professional Challenges cited in our Global Membership Survey:

  • Being included in the strategy and planning efforts within organizations
  • Demonstrating the value of communications to internal/external clients
  • Keeping up with the rapid pace of change in the field

This, from over 18,000 respondents where 72% have more than 10 years experience in the field.

Business leader interviews we conducted confirmed this familiar story: Communicators need to demonstrate business acumen and prove their ability to drive key business results. This is where we take our cue for advancing the profession over the next three years.

It’s time to prove the impact of strategic communications using #insightsandresults and to develop strategic communicators – through the Global Standard and certification – to become trusted business advisors.

What comes next? We vote at the AGM tomorrow to affirm our strategic intent

Input on these new Vision/Purpose/Philosophy statements was enthusiastic and incorporated into revisions approved by the International Executive Board to go forward to AGM vote. A special thank you to Ginger D. Homan, IABC secretary/treasurer and #IABC1720 co-author for leading this essential exercise to conclusion.

The three elements of the Purpose statement – Advance the Profession, Create Connection and Develop Strategic Communicators – form the pillars of the proposed framework for the 2017-2020 strategic plan.

As we look to the future, IABC’s next three years will aim to advance the profession through a proactive approach to thought leadership and by helping communicators realize their strategic potential as business advisers to prove their impact on the organizations they serve.

With this framework approved,  work to tie strategy to action for the 2017-18 term begins immediately at the International Executive Board meeting on Sunday. Stay tuned here for more as we put our best foot forward – together!

In my role as Vice Chair this year, it has been a privilege to lead this planning process. A note of sincere thanks to the 2016-17 board, regional, chapter and committee leaders for your time and ongoing engagement in this important work – and to our hardworking staff.

And finally, thank you to members and Gold Quill winners whose commitment to professional practice advances our standards of excellence each and every day.

Hope to see you here in Washington! #IABC17 awaits!

Sharon Hunter, Vice Chair

 

ByGinger D. Homan, ABC, SCMP

Transforming IABC

For the last three years, IABC has been under a transformation – revitalizing programs to improve membership retention and achieve financial sustainability. As we transition from the 2014/2017 strategy to the 2017/2020 strategy, we reviewed IABC’s vision, mission, purpose and philosophy statements to give clarity to who IABC is, what IABC does and the value we bring to communication professionals.

We started the review last fall with a global listening tour, holding appreciative inquiry sessions in every region, and then opened the conversation on this blog for input back in January. Armed with your input, vice chair Sharon Hunter and I presented draft statements at Leadership Institute in Dallas.

Knowing that these statements need to work at the chapter, regional and international levels, the input we got in Dallas from IABC leaders crystalized our path forward. We knew which statements were right, and which ones needed work. We also had a better understanding of what each statement should accomplish and who the intended audience was for each one.

A few times I heard members say, “I need to explain to my CEO the business value of IABC.” Your feedback, gave us our new value proposition: IABC is the only global association connecting me to the people and insights I need to drive business results.

Here are all the statements that will be added to the IABC bylaws and voted on at the Annual General Meeting on Saturday, 10, 2017 in Washington D.C.

  • Vision: Professional communicators at the heart of every organization.
  • Purpose: To advance the profession, create connection and develop strategic communicators.
  • Philosophy: IABC pledges to:
    • Represent the global profession.
    • Foster a diverse community.
    • Focus on insights and results.
    • Honor our Code of Ethics.
      We will achieve this by being open, contemporary and professional.

In addition, this statement will be updated in our Brand Guidebook. It is our elevator speech and will be used in marketing and communications materials.

  • Value Proposition: IABC is the only global association connecting me with the people and insights I need to drive business results.

All of these statements use the work of the Brand Task Force, led by Priya Bates, ABC, MC, CMP, IABC Fellow, as a foundation. That, coupled with your guidance, gives us four strong statements that can serve to unite us and guide our work. They reaffirm our strategic intent as an association to stay relevant into the future, underpinning the 2017-2020 new strategy framework that is currently in development. Stay tuned for more updates as we countdown to kick-off at World Conference in Washington, DC this June.

Thank you to IABC members around the globe who participated in this process and helped get us to a better, stronger place.

A brief sampling of feedback from Twitter:

ByGinger D. Homan, ABC, SCMP

Creating the IABC Vision, Purpose and Philosophy

What an incredible conversation we had at Leadership Institute about updating the IABC vision, purpose, philosophy and value proposition. Any time you look at change, you always expect push back – not spontaneous applause! I think we are all ready to have a statement that is our rally cry and that will keep us on track – at our chapters, regions and at international.

When we got home from Dallas, Sharon Hunter and I recreated the white board on my office wall. We took the time to go through each note and reflect on how it might change the message. It made us aware of a few things that we needed to keep in mind:

  • Remember who the audience is for each statement: Different statements have different target audiences. We need to keep that in mind as we incorporate all the comments and create the next draft.

For example, the vision statement is for us. That statement needs to set out our ultimate goal as an association so that professional communicators know, in a moment, what IABC is trying to accomplish. That is why the statement, “a professional communicator at the heart of every business,” resonated with so many members. It is what IABC is trying to accomplish

However, the value proposition is for our external audience – perhaps a fellow communicator about why they should join, or a business leader on why they should support our involvement. It definitely needs to include the business value and expected outcome. Great input.

  • Combine the mission and purpose statements: There was agreement that having both was redundant and since we are trying to simplify, we will combine these into one statement of purpose.
  • Business communicator vs. professional communicator: should we align with the name of the organization or The Global Standard that we support? Since we are trying to establish the business value of what we bring to the marketplace, it’s probably better to support The Global Standard – so “professional communicator” or “communication professional” will be the language used.
  • Review the statements as a whole. Each statement does not need to contain all the facts. However, as a group, they should reflect who we are as an association – and hopefully, start a new conversation.

We want a vision, purpose, philosophy and value proposition that resonates with our members and becomes our rally cry. The world café showed us that the three areas of our proposed purpose statement – advance the profession, create connections and develop professionals – work for chapters, regions and international. Now we need to work on the words around them.

We got clear feedback that “a force for good” does not resonant with our international audience. We took that to heart and the phrase is now on the cutting room floor (basically, my office floor).

Contributing at the World Cafe for IABC’s vision and purpose statements.

This has been an incredible experience – from getting your input in every region on the Listening Tour, to our hands-on work at Leadership Institute. Your voices are in our heads. We will continue to brainstorm, edit and tweak away. Good governance dictates that an association review these statements every three to five years, in conjunction with a new strategy cycle. So check back for updates posted here. Chapter delegates will vote on any changes at the Annual General  Meeting at World Conference in Washington D.C.

In the meantime, if you have an idea or suggestion, please send it to us, ginger@ziacommunications.com. We are updating these statements as part of our work to develop the next three-year strategy. Below is a chart that shows how all the pieces interconnect.

Recording ideas to take home.

Recording ideas to take home.

Together we can align the vision, purpose and philosophy statements so they guide our actions for the future, help us see the opportunities and ultimately, deliver enduring value to our community.

Together we can align the vision, purpose and philosophy statements so they guide our actions for the future, help us see the opportunities and ultimately, deliver enduring value to our community.

Thanks for all you do.

How Everything Fits

ByGinger D. Homan, ABC, SCMP

Setting Our Path: IABC’s Vision

For the past three months Vice Chair Sharon Hunter and I have been on a listening tour. Members from every region shared what IABC, at its best, means to them. These insights, along with the member survey from last summer, will direct the creation of the 2017/2020 strategy.

A significant piece of that process is to reconfirm that IABC’s vision, mission, philosophy and purpose, outlined in our bylaws, still reflects who we are as an organization. After all, these statements serve as guardrails for our path forward. Not only will they guide the strategy, they guide how we conduct business and set the framework for how we will grow. Specifically, we are reviewing:

  • Vision: what success ultimately looks like for IABC
  • Mission: gives IABC focus by describing what business we are in
  • Philosophy: sets out the intentions of how IABC will operate – the core values that we hold dear
  • Purpose: expresses the impact we want to have on the people we serve

The philosophy was actually updated a couple of years ago when we adopted a new set of brand guidelines, which listed our shared values. These principles define the culture and behavior of our organization and members – so basically our philosophy of doing business. They are:

  • We represent the global profession.
  • We create connection.
  • We are a diverse community.
  • We focus on insights and results.

A big note of gratitude to Priya Bates and her Taskforce team for creating such a comprehensive guide.

Over the next few months we will be grappling with the vision, mission and purpose statements. Are they motivational, are they concise, do they represent what members say they want from IABC?

As we consider how to refine these statements so they truly become our rally cry, we will post updates here. Then chapter leaders will vote on any updates at the AGM meeting at World Conference in Washington D.C.

In the meantime, if you have an idea or suggestion, please send it to us, ginger@ziacommunications.com. Together we can align the vision, mission and purpose statements so they guide our actions for the future, help us see the opportunities and ultimately, deliver enduring value to our community.

Photo Caption: Pacific Plains Region participating in a Listening Session

ByMichael Ambjorn

IABC International Executive Board – Applications Now Open

I want you to consider stepping up to serve the profession – by taking a leadership role at the highest strategic level.

I’d like you to consider taking a seat at the table. In the IABC boardroom.

Why?

At IABC we believe in a global standard for professional communication; one that is open, one that knows no borders. Our work is more important today than ever – and the next board year is a crucial one: it’ll see the kick-off of our next three-year strategy.

But I have to be honest with you: serving at this level is demanding, yet that has never put the best people off. It is an opportunity to join our skilled, diverse and gender-balanced board. Supported by a small cohort of full time staff at the International Headquarters, this group is responsible for the effective management and leadership of your Association on both the strategic and executive level.

IABC is now looking for applicants to serve on the 2017-18 International Executive Board, including for the role of Vice Chair.  Applications close on Wednesday, January 11th.

It’s excellent experience that will benefit you in your career. It’ll provide you with invaluable insight into the strategy and operation of a global organisation. You’ll make life-long friends too. I certainly have.

How

To apply, visit the IABC website now and find out more about the process and requirements. Again, applications must be in by Wednesday, January 11th

If you have any question about serving on the IEB, please reach out to current Board members, any of whom will be pleased to give you insights into the challenges and rewards of the role.

And please help spread the word about this opportunity. Here’s your hashtag: #IABCieb.

Thanks for all you do to advance professional communication around the world – and thanks for your continued support of IABC.

Michael Ambjorn
IABC Nominating Committee

BySharon Hunter

Bringing out the best in us: #IABC1720 Strategy sessions kickstart in Brussels today

Regional leaders launch our global conversation campaign to shape IABC’s next 3-year strategy at the Europe Middle East and North Africa (EMENA) leadership institute today.

  • What do you value most about IABC?
  • What works?
  • What do you want more of?
  • What brings life to our brand via the engagement and satisfaction you feel from being part of our professional communications community?

These questions frame the appreciative inquiry approach we’re using to create a shared vision of the future into 2020 and beyond.

Michael Nord, IEB member facilitating

Michael Nord, IEB member facilitating

Today we launch the discovery phase of this strategy process. It’s a global listening tour that will travel through a series of world cafes at regional conferences, leadership institutes and select chapter events over the next few months.

These sessions aim to engage our community to explore the best of what we are with an eye toward what more we could be.

Nikki Edwards, EMENA Chair

Nikki Edwards, EMENA Chair


IABC runs on a rolling three-year strategy cycle.  The #IABC1417 strategy closes out this year.  This new plan for 2017-20 will kick-off at World Conference in Washington, DC. Mark your calendars for 11-14 June 2017!
Alex Malouf

Alex Malouf, EMENA Vice Chair


The new plan will look to capitalize on gains, strive for continuity and build for the future based on the foundational assets we’ve secured. This is thanks to the prudent work of our predecessors. We managed a turnaround these last years through a focus on financial recovery and sustainability.  This guiding principle is one that we will commit to maintain moving forward.

Next steps will include a master session at the International Leadership Institute in Dallas, Texas happening February 23-25 2017.  Save the date!  The board will then review three iterations of the new plan before it lands at the AGM next June.

It is the Vice Chair’s role to lead this process. It’s a duty I’m honored to advance in collaboration with co-author Ginger Homan, ABC, IABC Secretary/Treasurer, Chair Dianne Chase and the Executive Committee, the entire board and all who will bring their passion and ideas forward to help us along. I thank you all for the time and energy that you will bring to this community effort.

Follow #IABC1720 for tweets coming out of EMENA today. Fellow IEB member Michael Nord is leading an inspired group including Nikki Edwards, EMENA Chair, Alex Malouf, Vice Chair and dedicated leaders from across the region.

Check back here often for ongoing updates. The conversation will continue through sessions in Heritage, Southern and Pacific Plains regions in October, South Africa in November and other area events to follow.

Have an idea, question or experience to share? Email vicechair@iabc.com – we’re listening!

With appreciation for all that you do,

Sharon Hunter, Vice Chair